Do This One Thing for Me at FringeNYC

Jane Elias is a fabulist, a bard, a griot, a fabler – a healer storyteller tasked with bearing the weight of memory. She has started the necessary journey of chronicling and sharing her family’s personal accounts of the Holocaust and it is a life affirming work. Her father was 16-years-old when the British freed him and the other survivors at Belsen-Bergen. The youngest survivors of the Holocaust are now in their 80’s and the need to preserve their experiences becomes a vital mission, so we never forget. Jane Elias gifts us with a deeply personal memoir of her relationship with

The Ferryman: Broadway Opening October 22nd – The Carney Family Is Ready For A Fight!!

Photo Credit: Joan Marcus When individuals talk about key commodities in life several needs come to mind. Food, water, procreation, love, money, binge watching "The Walking Dead". All of these utensils of life will come up, but more times than not a soul will say, "the love of family". To assist in propelling something larger than one self forward is in my opinion the definition of family. Websters Dictionary defines family as, "a group of people who share common ancestors". Family is your representation when you are gone. There is no opposite of heritage. To be from nowhere? There is no such

Lincoln Center’s white light festival on Film: Dreyer’s ‘Ordet’

Johannes (Preben Lerdorff Rye) . Wikipedia

  Now in its ninth year, Lincoln Center's white light festival explores ways of  better understanding one's self and others.  While there are no easy answers, generous programming in and around the complex provide artistic responses to seeking inner peace and fellowship.  Here at Stagebiz we are excited about, well, the stage, let's make an exceptional exception.  white light's first week included one of cinema's greatest seekers: Carl-Theodor Dreyer (1889-1968).  His disquieting Ordet (The Word, 1955), screened on October 18 at the Walter Reade Theater, illustrates the interchanging properties of "light" and "dark." The Danish director made only four feature films.  Three are

Scale 1:5 at The Rehearsal for Truth Theater Festival

The Hungarian theater company HOPPart brought their unique brand of site specific musical work to the streets of Yorkville on the Upper East Side with their production Scale 1:5. The show is part of the annual Rehearsal for Truth theater festival presented by The Vaclav Havel Library Foundation and the Bohemian Benevolent & Literary Association that brings the best of Central European theatre to NYC. HOPPart took audiences on a delightful, musical walking tour in the area formerly inhabited by Czech, German and Hungarian communities. Every audience member had their own wireless headset and you could hear the gorgeous a capella

The Resistable Rise of J.R. Brinkley at FringeNYC

This is a fresh, energetic, biting satire that deconstructs the power of the con man and the charming story teller. It has a Brechtian frame where political ideas are dissected and the audience are encouraged to engage their critical faculties while being entertained by exceptional performances and sublime musical interruptions. The Resistable Rise of J.R. Brinkley has enormous production value for a typical fringe show. It is a polished, innovative piece of political commentary that stays with you and inspires a burst of rampant googling because it’s based on a real person - John R. Brinkey. He was a quack,

Salome at The Irondale Center

James Rutherford’s new translation of Oscar Wilde’s 19th Century play gives us a palatable Salome for 2018 audiences. It interrogates the nature of desire and the fallout that ensues from the repression of self-expression. This production has an intense muscularity that makes you feel like you're a spectator at a gladiatorial fight between the unrequited and the objects of their sexual obsession. It sparks a sense of urgency as you get caught up in the various devices that instigate the unravelling and revelation of the characters true nature. We’ve all heard the story. Herod asks his step daughter to dance for

Ars Nova presents the world premiere of ‘Rags Parkland Sings The Songs Of The Future’

It's 2318 or thereabouts.  The United States is divided into Republics, Mars and the Moon colonized and technology restricted by law.  Despite everything, music survives! - thanks to Rags Parkland (Andrew R. Butler) and his show, Rags Parkland Sings The Songs Of The Future.  Rags is appearing nightly thru November 3, 2018 at Ars Nova in this provocative, thoroughly entertaining musical. Developed over an eight-year period at Ars Nova via ANT Fest and workshops, Butler's book, music and lyrics are set in Richmond's Over/Under Club run by saxophonist Gill (Tony Jarvis).  It's a both a return engagement and return to Earth for Rags, back from serving time in

Charles Goonan: Tune In To Goonan: The Story Of A Little Guy Making It Big

      Photos by: Tune In To Goonan     Cartoon Animation Credit: Chris Slavin Countless significant events happened forty years ago on October 20th 1978. "The Police" had their first concert at NYC's CBGB's, The U.S. Dollar devalued below Dutch Y2 and one Charles Xavier Goonan was born. My apologies, Xavier is not his middle, but it should be. Charles Goonan is a comedian and a product of Midwood Brooklyn. A town he has called home most of his life. Ask him about it, I'm sure he has a song that'll tell the story. Charles is a very talented comedian who has

Love Deadline at the 2018 United Solo Theatre Festival

This is the third time I have had the honor of reviewing a show by the colossal talent that is Ji Young Choi. She is a South Korean performer who blends classical Shakespearian texts with rituals and cultural practices from her home country to create an entirely new form. In Love Deadline she tackles the inner thoughts of the character of Desdemona as she stays isolated in her tea room for seven days wrestling with the source of Othello’s unexplained rage. This production had its world premiere at the United Solo Theatre Festival – a perfect platform for a solo

The Nap – Samuel J. Friedman Theatre

Manhattan Theatre Club's production of “The Nap” is the American debut of Richard Bean's new comedy about snooker, a British version of billiards that is to 8-ball what chess is to tic-tac-toe. Why would anyone who wasn't a snooker fan (and there can't be that many in the US) go see a play about it? Well, Bean has made it about gambling, cheating and quirky characters. To be fair, the play could be tweaked a bit to be about darts, golf or video games. It's the people we meet that makes the show work. In brief, Dylan Spokes (Ben Schnetzer) is

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