BAM Next Wave 2019: ‘The End of Eddy’

  "From my childhood I have no happy memories. I don’t mean to say that I never, in all those years, felt any happiness or joy. But suffering is all-consuming: it somehow gets rid of anything that doesn’t fit into its system."  Édouard Louis Young Adults are not the usual Next Wave Festival crowd, so BAM's new Artistic Director David Binder included them in his inaugural season of debuts.artists.  He and Next Wave couldn't have made a wiser choice than selecting Pamela Carter's adaptation of Édouard Louis's autobiographical novel The End of Eddy.  The joint production of Scotland's Untitled Projects and the U.K.'s Unicorn Theatre  chronicling the author's

Next Wave 2019: ‘The Second Woman’ at BAM Fisher

Alia Shawkat in The Second Woman at BAM_PC NayMarie-35.JPG

The happiest and worst memories are those that last, re-playing over and over in one's head.  Movies have the same effect, like smiling when thinking about Han Solo winking at Princess Leia in the throne room, or grinding teeth because the sights and sounds of La La Land won't ever go away.  Co-creators Nat Randall and Anna Breckon apply the continuous loop to The Second Woman.  Starting in BAM Fisher on Friday,October 18 at 5 PM and ending 24 hours later, the intrepid, amazing Alia Shawkat (Arrested Development, Transparent, Drunk History) repeated the same awkward love scene with 100 actors.  An

2018 BAM Next Wave Festival: Jerome Robbins’ ‘Watermill’

Joaquin De Luz. Photo courtesy of BAM

  A man looks back on his life.  As ballet plots go, Watermill is fairly straightforward.  It's in the telling that makes it Jerome Robbins' most theatrical and intimate work.  Predating the first Next Wave Festival by 11 years, the seldom-seen 1972 dance appeared at this year's Festival as part of the Jerome Robbins Centennial Celebration with recent New York City Ballet retiree Joaquin De Luz and students from the Conservatory of Dance at Purchase College SUNY. Robbins applied elements of his early modern dance training, work in Yiddish theatre, and Japanese Noh  to Watermill.  The choreographer said, "The ballet itself is influenced

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